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Biology Course Descriptions

SPRING 2019


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:


BIO 123:  General Biology II

(3 credits)

Section M001:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm)

Section M002:  Mon, Wed (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Instructor:  Jason Wiles

DESCRIPTION:  The second of a two-course sequence comprising a survey of major biological concepts ranging from the molecular level to global ecology.  Units within BIO 123 include biodiversity, plant structure and function, human and comparative animal anatomy and function, ecology, and evolution, which is the central and unifying concept of biology and the framework around which the understanding of other concepts in this course is constructed.

 

BIO 124:  General Biology II Laboratory

(1 credit)

Sections M003 - M025:  Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri (1 day/week - varied times)

Instructor:  Jason Wiles/Staff

DESCRIPTION:  This is the laboratory course associated with BIO 123.  Includes inquiry-based exploration and practical application of concepts discussed in BIO 123.  Students registered for BIO 124 must also register for BIO 123.

 

BIO 211:  Introduction to Neuroscience

(3 credits)

Section M001:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm)

Section M002:  Mon, Wed (2:15 - 3:35 pm)

Prerequisites:  high school Biology and Chemistry

Cross-listed with:  NEU 211

Instructor:  Robin Jones

DESCRIPTION:  This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain.  Students interested in the Neuroscience Integrated Learning Major (ILM) should know that this course is one of two possible entry-level required courses for that major.  Topics include the cell biology and function of nerve cells and associated cells such as glia, selected sensory systems, and control of movement.  Discussion of brain diseases and brain pathology will be used to illustrate brain function and structure concepts.  Two lectures weekly will be taught using Team-Based Learning and students will spend most of the class time working in teams to solve case-study problems as well as engage in other team-learning activities that promote deeper understanding of basic neuroscience concepts.

 

BIO 217:  Anatomy & Physiology II

(4 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm)

Laboratory:  Tue, Wed (1 day/week – varied times)

Recitation:  Mon, Thu, Fri (1 day/week – varied times)

Prerequisites:  BIO 121, BIO 123, and BIO 124; or equivalent

Instructor:  Melody Sweet

DESCRIPTION:  This is a continuation of the BIO 216 lecture and laboratory course studying the structure and function of human tissues, organs and systems.  The endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive and reproductive systems, metabolism, and energetics will be covered.  Laboratories will include bench-top and interactive computer experiments, anatomy, histology and non-invasive experiments on human subjects.  This course cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the Biology major.  Credit cannot be given for BIO 217 after successfully completing BIO 317.

 

BIO 223:  Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL) Leadership Training II

(2 credits)

Section M001:  Tue (11:00 - 11:55 am)

Section M002:  Thu (9:30 - 10:25 am)

Prerequisite:  PLTL I (course grade of B or higher)

Instructor:  Julia Snyder

DESCRIPTION:  This course relates educational research literature and learning to classroom applications in problem-solving activities.  Students are prepared to be peer leaders of a small, problem-solving group of students by attending weekly one-hour meetings and participating in Blackboard and in-class discussion groups.  Peer leaders are then responsible for holding a one-hour problem-solving session each week and keeping a record of attendance for their group sessions.

 

BIO 305:  Integrative Biology Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:  Mon (10:35 am - 12:05 pm)

Laboratory:  Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri (1 day/week - varied times)

Prerequisites:  BIO 121 or equivalent; and BIO 326, BIO 327, or BIO 345

Instructors:  Katharine Lewis, Eleanor Maine, and Mark Ritchie

DESCRIPTION:  This class provides students with early laboratory experience, presenting a quantitative, integrated view of subcellular, cellular, developmental, organismal, and ecosystem/environmental perspectives on biology.

 

BIO 317:  Anatomy & Physiology II for Biology Majors

(4 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm)

Laboratory/Recitation:  Fri (8:25 - 11:25 am or 12:45 - 3:45 pm)

Prerequisite:  BIO 121

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Melody Sweet

DESCRIPTION:  This Anatomy & Physiology II course is a 300-level course for Biology and Biochemistry majors.  It is a 4-credit course, of which 3 credits can be applied to the Biology major, unlike BIO 217.  This class will have the same lecture room and time (Mondays and Wednesdays, 12:45 to 2:05 pm) as BIO 217.  Students in the BIO 317 class will have weekly quizzes and midterm and final exams, as will those in BIO 217.  However, the students registered for BIO 317 will have a joint laboratory and recitation section on Fridays from 8:25 am to 11:25 am or 12:45 to 3:45 pm.  These sections will not be the same as the laboratory and recitation sections for BIO 217.  They will include a cat dissection, histology and other activities appropriate for a 300-level course.  Understanding of laboratory material will be evaluated with 2 to 3 laboratory practicals.  Credit cannot be given for BIO 317 after successful completion of BIO 217.

 

BIO 326:  Genetics

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 121 or equivalent; and CHE 106, CHE 109, or CHE 150

Instructors:  Sarah Hall and Ruth Phillips

DESCRIPTION:  This course discusses the principles of inheritance, structure and synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, microbial genetics, and recombinant DNA technology, and introduces you to the basic biology of modern genomics.

 

BIO 355:  General Physiology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 121 or equivalent; and CHE 106, CHE 109, or CHE 150

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Joseph Tupper

DESCRIPTION:  This is a lecture course on the physiology of mammals including circulation, kidney function, nervous system, sensory systems, muscle, cardiac function and digestion.

 

BIO 360:  Biology Lab Assistant

(1 credit)

Mon (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Prerequisite:  one upper-division 3-credit Biology lab, such as BIO 425 or BIO 435

Instructor:  Jason Wiles

DESCRIPTION:  Students who have completed an upper-division, 3-credit, one-hour lab may receive one credit hour for assisting in the teaching of laboratories.  This opportunity is especially appropriate for students considering teaching careers.  It may be repeated once for credit.

 

BIO 396:  Stem Cells & Society

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed, Fri (10:35 - 11:30 am)

Cross-listed with:  PHI 396 and REL 359

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructors:  Scott Erdman, R. Gustav Niebuhr, and Hille Paakkunainen

DESCRIPTION:  This course discusses the science of stem cells, and the philosophical, religious and legal complexities surrounding the research and use of stem cell technologies.

 

BIO 400 (Section M002):  Neurodegenerative Disease

(3 credits)

Wed (2:15 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M002); additional work is required of graduate students

Requirements:  open to Juniors and Seniors only; or consent of instructor

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Donna Korol

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar course is intended to review and stimulate discussion about the current status of our knowledge regarding neurodegenerative diseases, emphasizing distinctions between pathological and healthy brain aging.  While the main focus is on the etiology, neurobiology, and emergent symptoms of the diseases, broader biological, sociological, and historical perspectives are woven into the material.  This course will include student presentations and a variety of written assignments.

 

BIO 400 (Section M004):  Pharmaceuticals & Cells

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M004); additional work is required of graduate students

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Ruth Phillips

DESCRIPTION:  How do drugs affect cells, and why should we care?  Students will be introduced to a variety of signal transduction pathways and their function in the regulation of cellular processes.  To demonstrate applications of signal transduction in biotechnology, this course focuses on signaling cascades targeted in the treatment (or potential treatment) of medical conditions including cancer, asthma, depression, drug addiction, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and developmental abnormalities.

 

BIO 400 (Section M005):  Quantitative Methods for Life Scientists

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M005)

Requirements:  consent of instructor required for undergraduate enrollment

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Jason Fridley

DESCRIPTION:  This is a graduate-level course in statistics and data analysis for those conducting research in field- or laboratory-based life sciences.  Through a series of case studies involving the primary biological literature, students will discuss key statistical concepts (e.g., random sampling, modeling uncertainty, statistical independence, model inference, multilevel data) and their relation to common methods, including generalized regression, analysis of variance, contingency tables, mixed models, post hoc tests, and more advanced methods (e.g., maximum likelihood, Bayesian approaches, multivariate models), depending on student interests.  Students will be encouraged to work in groups on weekly assignments, and case studies will reflect student research areas.  There are no prerequisites, but students should be experienced with spreadsheet manipulation and have familiarity with or a desire to learn R.  

 

BIO 400 (Section M006):  Isotopic Approaches in Global Change Ecology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (2:00 - 3:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M006); additional work is required of graduate students

Requirements:  open to Juniors and Seniors only; or consent of instructor

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Katie Becklin

DESCRIPTION:  Natural changes in atmospheric composition and climate have had major impacts on individual organisms and ecosystem functioning over geologic time.  In addition to these natural changes, human activities have dramatically altered the functioning of current ecosystems, and this is only expected to increase into the future.  For this course, we will discuss basic research addressing the effects of climate and atmospheric changes on both current and ancient ecosystems, with specific emphasis on studies that use stable isotope chemistry to evaluate ecological and physiological responses of biota.  As part of this course, students will learn fundamental principles of isotope behavior and chemistry in natural systems, critically evaluate scientific studies that apply isotope chemistry to global change questions, and conduct authentic isotope research to learn basic methods of isotope sample preparation and data interpretation.  This course will be in a seminar format including lectures, discussions of current papers, student presentations, and various writing assignments.

 

BIO 400 (Section M008):  Ecosystem Science

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (12:30 - 1:50 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M008); additional work is required of graduate students

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Doug Frank

DESCRIPTION:  Ecosystem science is the study of the metabolism of energy and nutrients in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.  This course will include three modules addressing:  1) the controls on flows of energy and nutrients in ecosystems, 2) how climate change are/will disrupt these dynamics, and 3) some societal consequences of climate change.  The course will be in a seminar format with most classes involving student-led discussions of papers published in the primary literature.

 

BIO 400 (Section M009):  Biology of Learning & Memory

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 600 (Section M009); additional work is required of graduate students

Prerequisites (any 2 of the following 5):  BIO 211, BIO 217, BIO 317, BIO 327, or PSY 223

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Paul Gold

DESCRIPTION:  Behavioral adaptations based on individual experiences give animals the ability to use their pasts to solve new problems, an ability that can be obviously important to an animal's survival.  This course will examine behavioral plasticity and the brain mechanisms responsible for the changes in behavior.  Interestingly, there appears to be considerable conservation across much of the animal kingdom of basic biological mechanisms that mediate behavioral and brain plasticity.  The class will include information that crosses several levels of analysis, from the organism, to brain systems, to neurons, to synapses, to biochemical mechanisms.  The class will also consider information about memory dysfunctions as seen in aging, dementia, and retardation in humans and in laboratory model animals such as rats and mice.  The format will be lecture/discussion sessions with evaluations of student performance based on participation, writing assignments, and exams.

 

BIO 405:  Introduction to Field Biology Laboratory

(4 credits)

Tue, Thu (3:30 - 4:50 pm)

Prerequisite:  BIO 121

Other requirements:  consent of instructor is required

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement, 3 credits of upper-division lab experience

Instructor:  Kari Segraves

DESCRIPTION:  Scientific methods and experimental designs are discussed in class.  Intensive field research is conducted during spring break at the Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid, Florida.  Participation in the field trip for its full duration is required.  Daily notes pertaining to scientific observations and data collection will be kept during the field trip.  Students will design, implement, and write-up team projects.

 

BIO 407:  Advanced Neuroscience

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Meets with:  BIO 607; additional work is required of graduate students

Cross-listed with:  NEU 407

Prerequisite:  BIO 211 or NEU 211

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Sandra Hewett

DESCRIPTION:  An advanced introduction to neuroscience taught at the upper undergraduate or beginning graduate student level.  The course spans the anatomy, physiology and chemistry of the nervous system, from the molecular to the cellular and systems level.  Topics include neurons and electrochemical and biophysical properties of neurons, neurochemistry, sensory and motor systems, neural plasticity and development.  It is a required course for students enrolled in the Neuroscience ILM.

 

BIO 409:  General Microbiology

(4 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed, Fri (11:40 am - 12:35 pm)

Laboratory:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm or 2:15 - 3:35 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Anthony Garza

DESCRIPTION:  This lecture and laboratory course introduces students to the biology of microorganisms and to microbial diseases.  Pathogenic microorganisms, microbial diseases, public health issues, and immunology are all reviewed in General Microbiology.  The major emphasis of the remainder of the course is bacteriology, but there are a number of lectures devoted to viruses, protozoa, algae and fungi.  Topics in bacteriology include the structure of bacteria, bacterial genetics and gene regulation, and the ecology of bacteria.  The laboratory emphasizes the basic skills necessary to isolate, cultivate and identify microorganisms.  This is a 4-credit course, which only satisfies 1 credit of lab experience.

 

BIO 416:  Biology of Aging

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (2:00 - 3:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 616; additional work is required of graduate students

Prerequisite:  BIO 327 or BIO 355

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Donna Korol

DESCRIPTION:  Aging is an intrinsic property of all living organisms.  However, the way in which aging manifests itself varies quite broadly within and between species.  To understand the complex nature of aging and its place in the life cycle, this course will review topics related to the biology of aging across many levels of analysis from molecule to cell to system to organism.  Classic and contemporary aging research will be evaluated from a variety of experimental models.  In the process, we will dispel some of the myths of aging even as they relate to basic scientific findings and evaluate how the conventional wisdom on aging issues obtained through the media and other public sources reflects and influences basic research findings.  Organization of the course includes lectures, discussions, quizzes, and a variety of written assignments.

 

BIO 419:  Junior and Senior Thesis Seminar

(1 credit)

Tue (5:00 - 6:00 pm)

Prerequisite:  acceptance into a Biology thesis program (Honors or Distinction)

Instructors:  Scott Erdman and Kari Segraves

DESCRIPTION:  A discussion and student presentation format course designed to introduce highly qualified students to biological research.  Students present progress reports on their thesis research.  The course is designed for open communication among people with interests in biological research.  It must be taken for four semesters.

 

BIO 421 (Section M002):  Capstone Seminar in Biotechnology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Prerequisite:  BIO 463

Co-requisite:  BIO 464

Other requirements:  Senior Biotechnology Majors only; consent of instructor is required for all other students

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement

Instructor:  Heather Coleman

DESCRIPTION:  This is a seminar course for upper-level students, particularly (but not limited to) those completing a major in Biotechnology.  Students will evaluate scientific papers, current news stories, and biotechnology related issues.  Evaluation will occur through readings, oral presentations, written assignments, and class discussion.

 

BIO 425:  Cell & Developmental Biology Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:  Tue (12:30 - 1:25 pm)

Laboratory:  Thu (12:30 - 4:30 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; 3 credits of upper-division lab experience

Instructor:  Melissa Pepling

DESCRIPTION:  This course reviews current methods employed in cell and developmental biology studies, including microscopy and imaging techniques, spatial analyses of gene expression, protein expression and localization, cell fractionation, and immunocytochemistry.  In addition, it reviews general laboratory methods, data analysis and reporting.

 

BIO 428:  Environmental Science

(3 credits)

Tue (11:00 am - 1:30 pm)

Cross-listed with:  EAR 428

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Mark Ritchie

DESCRIPTION:  This is a seminar course for upper-level students, particularly those following the Environmental Science Curriculum (but not limited to) within a Biology or Earth Sciences major.  Students will work together to critically evaluate, and propose solutions to, current environmental problems using a combination of reading, class discussion, written analyses and oral presentations.  The predominant focus will be conducting independent research projects regarding important environmental problems.

 

BIO 441:  Infectious Diseases

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 641; additional work is required of graduate students

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Anthony Garza

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar course focuses on human diseases caused by infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria.  Research on infectious diseases, the organisms that cause infectious diseases and disease treatments will be presented and discussed.  The course also includes lectures related to the discussed material and disease case studies when possible.

 

BIO 448:  Evolutionary Medicine

(3 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed (12:45 - 1:40pm)

Discussion:  Fri (1 day/week - varied times)

Prerequisites:  BIO 121 and BIO 345 (Spring)

Co-requisite:  BIO 345 (Fall)

Course fulfills these requirements:  Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructors:  David Althoff and Kari Segraves

DESCRIPTION:  This course applies evolutionary principles to strengthen the prevention and treatment of human diseases.  Can we cure the common cold?  How and why do some emerging diseases become pandemic whereas others remain localized?  Topics include management of diseases to decrease transmission rates and virulence, the germ theory of disease, antibiotic resistance, epidemiology, human evolution, and the history of medicine.  Diseases such as malaria, influenza, HIV/AIDS, and cholera will be used as examples. In-class discussions and simulations will supplement the lecture.

 

BIO 456:  Human Disease Genomics

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Meets with:  BIO 656; additional work is required of graduate students

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EE) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Steve Dorus

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar class introduces students to influential genomic studies relating to human evolution and the etiology and epidemiology of human disease.  Recent insights into the genetic basis of human adaptation and its potential relevance to disease predisposition will be discussed.

 

BIO 460/BCM 460:  Research in Biology/Biochemistry

(1 - 4 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  BIO 460 is intended for Biology majors and BCM 460 is intended for Biochemistry majors who wish to participate in either an experimental laboratory or field research project.  BIO 460/BCM 460 replaces the use of independent study or experience credit courses for research purposes.  Student research projects will incorporate use of the scientific method, experimentation, data analysis, data presentation and interpretation, and the responsibilities of scientific integrity.  To enroll in BIO 460/BCM 460, the student must seek a sponsor who is willing to direct an appropriate project.  Typically, the sponsor will assign the student to some aspect of an existing, larger research project.  In consultation with the sponsor, the student will submit a form with the Undergraduate Academic Support Coordinator of the Biology Department which states the nature of the project, the expectations regarding time commitment (3 hours per week per credit hour), and the means for evaluation.  The student will then receive a permission number to enroll in the course.  The grading procedure is based on:  1) the faculty member's evaluation of overall student performance, and 2) examination of required laboratory records or notebooks.  Evaluation may also include a written report documenting the experience and results in a scientific format.  Students can enroll in BIO 460/BCM 460 more than once, but only a total of 4 credits can be applied to the Biology/Biochemistry major requirements.  The 4 credits can be used as an upper-division lab experience or an upper-division elective.

 

BIO 461:  Experience in Biology

(0 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This is an internship or work experience supervised by a faculty mentor.  Projects may include experimentation, data analysis, presentation, and responsibilities of scientific integrity.  Development and analysis of business plans or intellectual property in biotechnology-focused companies, agencies or law firms is also possible.

 

BIO 464:  Applied Biotechnology

(4 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed, Fri (11:40 am - 12:35 pm) (Section M001)

Laboratory:  Tue (12:30 - 3:45 pm) (Section M002)

Note:  Enrollment in the lab (Section M002) will automatically enroll you in the lecture (Section M001)

Meets with:  BIO 664; additional work is required of graduate students

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement; 3 credits of upper-division lab experience

Instructor:  Surabhi Raina

DESCRIPTION:  This is the second course of a two-course Biotechnology series.  The first course, BIO 463 Molecular Biotechnology, is offered in the fall.  These courses complement each other, but one is not required for the other.  They introduce students to the molecular and genetic principles and processes involved in biotechnology.  Lectures will include topics such as the genetic modification of microbial, plant, and animal cells, forensic biotechnology, and important medical, industrial, agricultural and environmental applications of biotechnology.  Labs will cover many of the methods routinely used in biotechnology labs.  This course will address such questions as:  what is biotechnology, how is it done, and how is it being used today?  How can biotechnology impact lives of humans and other animals, plants, and the environment?  What are the issues that biotechnology raises about the role of science and technology in society and ethical issues related to Biotechnology?

 

BIO 465:  Molecular Biology Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:

Section M001:  Mon (12:45 - 1:40 pm)

Section M002:  Tue (12:30 - 1:25 pm)

Laboratory:

Section M001:  Wed (12:45 - 4:45 pm)

Section M002:  Thu (12:30 - 4:30 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 665 (Sections M001 and M002); additional work is required of graduate students

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  communication skills requirement; Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement; 3 credits of upper-division lab experience

DESCRIPTION:  Surabhi Raina (Section M001) and Ramesh Raina (Section M002)

Description:  This laboratory will teach basic experimental techniques including DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease cleavage of DNA, gene cloning, tissue culture techniques, construction of transgenic plants, gene expression analysis, and other techniques central to Molecular Biology.

 

BIO 476:  Cold Cases

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 676; additional work is required of graduate students

Cross-listed with:  FSC 476 and FSC 676

Prerequisites:  B- or better in BIO 327 and CHE 275

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Robert Silver

DESCRIPTION:  This class involves methods and practice in solving unsolved cases using fundamental science, court documents, and other sources of information.  Students will work on real cases.

 

BCM 476:  Biochemistry II

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed, Fri (9:30 - 10:25 am)

Prerequisite:  BCM 475

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Staff

DESCRIPTION:  Biochemistry II is a continuation of Biochemistry I.  It covers:  1) mechanisms, integration and regulation of intermediary, autotrophic, nitrogen, and energy metabolism; 2) structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins; and 3) the nature and function of subcellular organelles.

 

BCM 477:  Protein & Nucleic Acids Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:  Mon (2:15 - 3:15 pm)

Laboratory:  Wed (12:45 - 4:45 pm)

Meets with:  BCM 677; additional work is required of graduate students

Cross-listed with:  CHE 477

Prerequisites:  BIO 305; and BIO 326, BCM 475 or CHE 474

Course fulfills these requirements:  3 credits of upper-division lab experience

Instructor:  Davoud Mozhdehi

DESCRIPTION:  This class will involve experimental methods for production and purification of biomacromolecules with an emphasis on recent breakthroughs in biomolecular engineering.  The course will include topics such as genetically encoded materials; polymerase chain reaction; site-directed mutagenesis; protein expression and purification; post-translational modification of proteins, nucleic acid, and protein electrophoresis.

 

BIO 490:  Independent Study

(1 - 6 credits)

Varied Times

Requirements:  enrollment requires consent of the supervising instructor(s) and the department 

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This is an exploration of a problem, or problems, in depth based on a plan submitted by the student.  A proposal is required.

 

BIO 495:  Distinction Thesis in Biology

(1 - 3 credits)

Varied Times

Requirements:  enrollment requires consent of the department

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This course is for students preparing a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Distinction in Biology Program.  Distinction students will enroll in the semester prior to graduation.

 

BIO 499/BCM 499:  Biology/Biochemistry Honors Capstone Project

(1 - 3 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This is the completion of an Honors Capstone Project under the supervision of a faculty member.

 

BIO 501:  Biology of Cancer

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Requirements:  per the instructor, acquisition and use of the Turning Point QT or QT2 transmitter (not the RF 'clicker') is required

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Tom Fondy

DESCRIPTION:  This course covers four areas:  1) clinical features:  extent, effects, epidemiology, pathology, definitions, classifications, and model systems; 2) basic biology of cancer cells: growth, biochemical characteristics, progression, invasion, metastasis; 3) causation: viral oncogenesis, oncogenes, suppressor genes, apoptosis; and 4) management: host response, immunology, and immunotherapy.

 

BIO 503:  Developmental Biology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Jessica MacDonald

DESCRIPTION:  This course will examine the mechanisms that control animal development at the cellular and molecular levels.  Topics to be covered include patterns of early embryonic cleavage and morphogenesis, mechanisms of cellular differentiation, mechanisms of morphogenesis, pattern formation, and the genetic control of development.  The class will emphasize the wide variety of experimental approaches used to study different aspects of development.  Please note that this is not a descriptive embryology course.  Rather, the goal is to provide students with an understanding of developmental mechanisms.  Classes will involve lectures, small group discussions, and general discussions.

 

BIO 565:  Cellular Physiology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (2:00 - 3:20 pm)

Prerequisites:  BIO 326 and BIO 327

Course fulfills these requirements:  Cell & Molecular Biology (CM) distribution requirement

Instructor:  Melody Sweet

DESCRIPTION:  This course will take a more in-depth look at extra-nuclear cell functions.  Emphasis will be placed on animal cell physiology.  Topics will include cell membranes, cytoskeleton, organelle structure and function, cell adhesion

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GRADUATE COURSES:


BIO 600 (Section M002):  Neurodegenerative Disease

(3 credits)

Wed (2:15 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M002)

Instructor:  Donna Korol

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar course is intended to review and stimulate discussion about the current status of our knowledge regarding neurodegenerative diseases, emphasizing distinctions between pathological and healthy brain aging.  While the main focus is on the etiology, neurobiology, and emergent symptoms of the diseases, broader biological, sociological, and historical perspectives are woven into the material.  This course will include student presentations and a variety of written assignments.

 

BIO 600 (Section M003):  Global Change Biology Seminar

(1 credit)

Wed (12:45 - 2:05 pm)

Instructor:  Katie Becklin

DESCRIPTION:  Global change, including climate change, is rapidly becoming one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century.  This course introduces students to the challenges posed by global change through a unique multidisciplinary exploration of the scientific, economic, political, communicative, and even philosophical dimensions of the issue.  The course will cover topics such as the current state of scientific knowledge about global change, competing discourses regarding global change, risk and uncertainty in decision-making, actions taken to address the issues, and the ethical dimensions of these actions.

 

BIO 600 (Section M004):  Pharmaceuticals & Cells

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M004); additional work is required of graduate students

Instructor:  Ruth Phillips

DESCRIPTION:  How do drugs affect cells, and why should we care?  Students will be introduced to a variety of signal transduction pathways and their function in the regulation of cellular processes.  To demonstrate applications of signal transduction in biotechnology, this course focuses on signaling cascades targeted in the treatment (or potential treatment) of medical conditions including cancer, asthma, depression, drug addiction, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and developmental abnormalities.

 

BIO 600 (Section M005):  Quantitative Methods for Life Scientists

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M005)

Instructor:  Jason Fridley

DESCRIPTION:  This is a graduate-level course in statistics and data analysis for those conducting research in field- or laboratory-based life sciences.  Through a series of case studies involving the primary biological literature, students will discuss key statistical concepts (e.g., random sampling, modeling uncertainty, statistical independence, model inference, multilevel data) and their relation to common methods, including generalized regression, analysis of variance, contingency tables, mixed models, post hoc tests, and more advanced methods (e.g., maximum likelihood, Bayesian approaches, multivariate models), depending on student interests.  Students will be encouraged to work in groups on weekly assignments and case studies will reflect student research areas.  There are no prerequisites but students should be experienced with spreadsheet manipulation and have familiarity with or a desire to learn R.

 

BIO 600 (Section M006):  Isotopic Approaches in Global Change Ecology

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (2:00 - 3:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M006); additional work is required of graduate students

Instructor:  Katie Becklin

DESCRIPTION:  Natural changes in atmospheric composition and climate have had major impacts on individual organisms and ecosystem functioning over geologic time.  In addition to these natural changes, human activities have dramatically altered the functioning of current ecosystems, and this is only expected to increase into the future.  For this course, we will discuss basic research addressing the effects of climate and atmospheric changes on both current and ancient ecosystems, with specific emphasis on studies that use stable isotope chemistry to evaluate ecological and physiological responses of biota.  As part of this course, students will learn fundamental principles of isotope behavior and chemistry in natural systems, critically evaluate scientific studies that apply isotope chemistry to global change questions, and conduct authentic isotope research to learn basic methods of isotope sample preparation and data interpretation.  The class will be in a seminar format including lectures, discussions of current papers, student presentations, and various writing assignments.

 

BIO 600 (Section M008):  Ecosystem Science

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (12:30 - 1:50 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M008); additional work is required of graduate students

Instructor:  Doug Frank

DESCRIPTION:  Ecosystem science is the study of the metabolism of energy and nutrients in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.  This course will include three modules addressing:  1) the controls on flows of energy and nutrients in ecosystems, 2) how climate change are/will disrupt these dynamics, and 3) some societal consequences of climate change.  The course will be a seminar type format with most classes involving student-led discussions of papers published in the primary literature.

 

BIO 600 (Section M009):  Biology of Learning & Memory

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 400 (Section M009); additional work is required of graduate students

Instructor:  Paul Gold

DESCRIPTION:  Behavioral adaptations based on individual experiences give animals the ability to use their pasts to solve new problems, an ability that can be obviously important to an animal's survival.  This course will examine behavioral plasticity and the brain mechanisms responsible for the changes in behavior.  Interestingly, there appears to be considerable conservation across much of the animal kingdom of basic biological mechanisms that mediate behavioral and brain plasticity.  The class will include information that crosses several levels of analysis, from the organism, to brain systems, to neurons, to synapses, to biochemical mechanisms.  It will also consider information about memory dysfunctions as seen in aging, dementia, and retardation in humans and in laboratory model animals such as rats and mice.  The format will be lecture/discussion sessions with evaluations of student performance based on participation, writing assignments, and exams.

 

BIO 607:  Advanced Neuroscience

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Meets with:  BIO 407 and NEU 407

Instructor:  Sandra Hewett

DESCRIPTION:  An advanced introduction to neuroscience taught at the upper undergraduate or beginning graduate student level.  The course spans the anatomy, physiology and chemistry of the nervous system, from the molecular to the cellular and systems level.  Topics include neurons and electrochemical and biophysical properties of neurons, neurochemistry, sensory and motor systems, neural plasticity and development.

 

BIO 610:  Graduate Research Laboratory

(2 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This course is credit earned for work in a research laboratory to acquire skills and techniques under a faculty mentor.  It may be repeated once or twice, for a maximum of 6 credits total.

 

BIO 616:  Biology of Aging

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (2:00 - 3:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 416

Instructor:  Donna Korol

DESCRIPTION:  Aging is an intrinsic property of all living organisms.  However, the way in which aging manifests itself varies quite broadly within and between species.  To understand the complex nature of aging and its place in the life cycle, this course will review topics related to the biology of aging across many levels of analysis from molecule to cell to system to organism.  Classic and contemporary aging research will be evaluated from a variety of experimental models.  In the process, we will dispel some of the myths of aging even as they relate to basic scientific findings and evaluate how the conventional wisdom on aging issues obtained through the media and other public sources reflects and influences basic research findings.  Organization of the course includes lectures, discussions, quizzes, and a variety of written assignments.

 

BIO 641:  Infectious Diseases

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (11:00 am - 12:20 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 441

Instructor:  Anthony Garza

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar course focuses on human diseases caused by infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria.  Research on infectious diseases, the organisms that cause infectious diseases and disease treatments will be presented and discussed.  The course also includes lectures related to the discussed material and disease case studies when possible.

 

BIO 656:  Human Disease Genomics

(3 credits)

Tue, Thu (9:30 - 10:50 am)

Meets with:  BIO 456

Instructor:  Steve Dorus

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar class introduces students to influential genomic studies relating to human evolution and the etiology and epidemiology of human disease.  Recent insights into the genetic basis of human adaptation and its potential relevance to disease predisposition will be discussed.

 

BIO 664:  Applied Biotechnology

(4 credits)

Lecture:  Mon, Wed, Fri (11:40 am - 12:35 pm) (Section M001)

Laboratory:  Tue (12:30 - 3:45 pm) (Section M002)

Note:  Enrollment in the lab (Section M002) will automatically enroll you in the lecture (Section M001)

Meets with:  BIO 464; additional work is required of graduate students

Instructor:  Surabhi Raina

DESCRIPTION:  This is the second course of a two-course Biotechnology series.  The first course, BIO 463 Molecular Biotechnology, is offered in the fall.  These courses complement each other, but one is not required for the other.  They introduce students to the molecular and genetic principles and processes involved in biotechnology.  Lectures will include topics such as the genetic modification of microbial, plant, and animal cells, forensic biotechnology, and important medical, industrial, agricultural and environmental applications of biotechnology.  Labs will cover many of the methods routinely used in biotechnology labs.  This course will address such questions as:  What is biotechnology, how is it done, and how is it being used today?  How can biotechnology impact lives of humans and other animals, plants, and the environment?  What are the issues that biotechnology raises about the role of science and technology in society and ethical issues related to biotechnology?

 

BIO 665:  Molecular Biology Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:

Section M001:  Mon (12:45 - 1:40 pm)

Section M002:  Tue (12:30 - 1:25 pm)

Laboratory:

Section M001:  Wed (12:45 - 4:45 pm)

Section M002:  Thu (12:30 - 4:30 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 465 (Sections M001 and M002); additional work is required of graduate students

Instructors:  Surabhi Raina (Section M001) and Ramesh Raina (Section M002)

DESCRIPTION:  This laboratory will teach basic experimental techniques including DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease cleavage of DNA, gene cloning, tissue culture techniques, construction of transgenic plants, gene expression analysis, and other techniques central to Molecular Biology.

 

BIO 676:  Cold Cases

(3 credits)

Mon, Wed (3:45 - 5:05 pm)

Meets with:  BIO 476

Cross-listed with:  FSC 476 and FSC 676

Instructor:  Robert Silver

DESCRIPTION:  This class involves methods and practice in solving unsolved cases using fundamental science, court documents, and other sources of information.  Students will work on real cases.

 

BCM 677:  Proteins & Nucleic Acids Laboratory

(3 credits)

Lecture:  Mon (2:15 - 3:15 pm)

Laboratory:  Wed (12:45 - 4:45 pm)

Meets with:  BCM 477

Cross-listed with:  CHE 477

Instructor:  Davoud Mozhdehi

DESCRIPTION:  This class will involve experimental methods for production and purification of biomacromolecules with an emphasis on recent breakthroughs in biomolecular engineering.  The course will include topics such as genetically encoded materials; polymerase chain reaction; site-directed mutagenesis; protein expression and purification; post-translational modification of proteins, nucleic acid, and protein electrophoresis.

 

BIO 688:  Biological Literature

(1 - 3 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  A student reviews a specific area in conjunction with a faculty member in this tutorial.  Prior to the beginning of the semester, a proposal for Independent Study must be completed (in which the area and procedures for evaluation are described), signed by the supervising professor and given to the Undergraduate Academic Support Coordinator in the Biology Department for processing.

 

BIO 690:  Independent Study

(1 - 6 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied

DESCRIPTION:  This course is a special project in which a graduate student conducts laboratory or field research unrelated to his/her thesis or dissertation research and supervised by a faculty member other than his/her supervisor.  Prior to the beginning of the semester, a proposal for Independent Study must be completed (in which the project and procedures for evaluation are described), signed by the supervising professor and given to the Undergraduate Academic Support Coordinator in the Biology Department for processing.

 

BIO 705:  Graduate Research Seminars

(0 - 1 credit)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Jason Fridley

DESCRIPTION:  Students present their thesis or dissertation research and critically evaluate the research presentations of other students.

 

BIO 997:  Master's Thesis

(0 - 6 credits)

Instructor:  Varied

 

BIO 999:  Dissertation

(0 - 15 credits)

Varied Times

Instructor:  Varied


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Last updated:  30-OCT-2018